Mirror, Shoulder, Signal

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Read 27/09/2020-04/10/2020

Rating 4 stars

Dorthe Nors’ fifth novel examines the crisis of middle age as experienced by a single woman estranged from her sister and trying to work out what she wants from life. It’s a funny and moving book, with a deadpan humour that wrong foots the reader from time to time with its seriousness. Continue reading

The Susan Effect

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Read 16/09/2018-25/09/2018

Rating: 5 stars

Read for the Reader’s Room European Backpacking Challenge.

Years ago my friend Sharon lent me Peter Høeg’s novel Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow. I loved it.

I read Borderliners as well. I didn’t love it as much as Miss Smilla but it was still good.

I haven’t read anything by Peter Høeg since then. I needed a book set in Denmark or written by someone Danish for the reading challenge I’ve been doing this summer. Looking around online I discovered that Høeg’s latest book was out in paperback. I read the blurb and it sounded like fun. Continue reading

City of Strangers

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Read 24/06/2016-26/06/2016

Rating: 4 stars

LibraryThing review

I picked this up off the New Books shelf at my local library. The blurb on the back sounded really interesting, and there’s an advert on the last page for the author Louise Millar’s collective of female crime writers.

As soon as I started it, I was gripped. Main character Grace Scott is a photo journalist based in Edinburgh. She returns home from honeymoon to find a dead man in her new flat. Recently bereaved herself, she becomes obsessed with tracking down the man’s family so that they can grieve for him. Her husband doesn’t understand her obsession and isn’t best pleased when her investigations take her from Edinburgh to London, and then on to Amsterdam and Paris.
Continue reading

The Lost Boy

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Read 04/06/2016-09/06/2016

Rating: 3.5 stars

At first, I felt as though I should have read the previous six books in the series. Läckberg had the tricky task of acknowledging that her seventh in the Patrik Hedström/Erica Falck series of crime novels might be the first of her books that a reader encounters, while not going over old ground too much for existing fans. For the most part she succeeded but there were moments when I was aware that there were events in previous books that I wasn’t getting full disclosure on, and it felt slightly frustrating. Continue reading

We, The Drowned

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Read 26/09/2015-01/10/2015

Rating: 5 stars

What an incredible book. Horrifying and hopeful in equal measure. It is a fiction, but it is born out of fact. Jensen has researched the history of Danish shipping town Marstal and woven a beautiful tale of all that is good and bad in humanity. I didn’t think I was going to enjoy it at first. The opening chapter seemed flippant. However, once more characters were introduced and Jensen’s almost Conradian understanding of humanity took hold, I was completely gripped. It is a tale spanning 100 years of a town’s history, and a story of how people deal with their moments of ugliness through fellowship.

As well as the excitement of the characters’ adventures at sea, there is also a deep understanding of what it is to be human. The good and the bad in people is described unflinchingly. The characters deal with their weaknesses and inadequacies through fellowship. As I was reading, I kept thinking about Joseph Conrad’s writing, and I was pleased to see Conrad acknowledged by Jensen, who had drawn on The Shadow Line for detail about what it was like to be an inexperienced sea captain at the end of the 19th century. It prompted me to read The Shadow Line straight after.