Six Degrees of Separation: From The Bass Rock to The Lowland

Hello June, here so soon. I’m a day late for this month’s Six Degrees of Separation because summer arrived in Manchester this week and yesterday was too glorious to pass up the chance to read in the garden. Kate, who hosts the meme at Books Are My Favourite and Best, has chosen the Stella Prize winning book The Bass Rock for the first book in the chain.

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Six Degrees of Separation: From Beezus and Ramona to Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

It’s May Day! Beltane, if you will. I wish I’d been clever enough to do a folk horror Six Degrees of Separation this month. Kate, who hosts the meme at Books Are My Favourite and Best, has chosen a children’s classic, Beezus and Ramona, for the first book in the chain. Read on to see how I end up in a submarine with Captain Nemo.

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Six Degrees of Separation: from Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret to Fantastic Mr Fox

December’s here already, and the first Saturday of the month brings with it Six Degrees of Separation. At the start of the year, I decided that I would attempt to create a chain for the meme every month. And here I am, at the end of the year, with my twelfth chain. This month, we’re starting with Judy Blum’s 1970 classic Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret.

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Rooftoppers

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Read 17/05/2016

Rating: 3 stars

I changed my library books today. One of the books I chose turned out to be children’s fiction mis-shelved in the adult fiction section.

Rooftoppers is a magical mix of The Silver Sword, The Summer Book and Tom’s Midnight Garden, shot through with the child-like wonder of Amélie. Continue reading

The Family from One End Street

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Read 02/01/2016-03/01/2016

Rating: 5 stars

Read for The Reader’s Room Winter Scavenger Hunt Challenge

The Family From One End Street is a British children’s classic, and a book I read and re-read as a child, repeatedly borrowing it from the library. Eve Garnett did a brave thing for the time in taking the things she saw of the lives of poor children living in London in the 1920s and writing a children’s book that acknowledged that poverty but showed that working class parents loved and protected their children as much as middle class parents, and that children have the same love of adventure no matter where they sit in the social structure. Many publishers turned the manuscript down, but eventually it was published and Garnett beat Tolkien’s The Hobbit to win the Carnegie Medal. Continue reading